Name of Church St. George Melkite-Greek Catholic Church
Address 1620 Bell Street, Sacramento CA 95866
Phone number (916) 920-2900
Website www.stgeorge-melkite.org
Worship Schedule Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Vespers. Sunday, 10 a.m., Orthros. 10:30 a.m., Divine Liturgy. Feast day eve: 6:30 p.m., Vespers. Feast day: 6:30 p.m., Divine Liturgy.
Names of priests Father Brendan McAnerney, OP. Father Brendan is a Dominican priest ordained in the Latin rite, with faculties to serve as a Melkite-Greek priest. He was recently appointed pastor of the parish. Father is known for his expertise in iconology and iconography.
Confession By request; often confessions are held before or after the liturgy.
Special events Check the calendar on the website for upcoming events; next major event is a parish BBQ in August.
Liturgy/Music The liturgy is sung. Most is in English, although you’ll hear some Arabic and Greek. If you plan to attend, read online about the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom to prepare you for what you’ll experience. The structure is similar to the Latin rite, with an entrance, liturgy of the word, homily, liturgy of the Eucharist, communion and closing prayers.
Fellow parishioners Typically persons of Middle Eastern descent, but all are welcome.
Parking Ample
Cry room No
Additional observations St. George is part of the Melkite-Greek Catholic eparchy (diocese) of Newton, Massachusetts, which includes the entire continental U.S. It is in union with Rome. St. George’s first liturgy was in 1977; liturgy at its present site began in 1979. It serves 70 Melkite-Greek Catholic families in the Sacramento area. They worship according to the ancient Byzantine liturgy. It’s a different experience for Latin-rite Catholics. Parishioners, for example, either sit or stand; there is usually no kneeling. Services use incense.

There are many icons, which are considered windows to heaven, throughout the church. In the front of the church is an icon screen; the other side is considered heaven on earth. (Pointing out icons and discussing their significance can be a great way to keep the attention of squirmy children.)

Holy Communion is by tincture, or dipping the host into the chalice and administering it to the faithful with a small spoon. All the baptized receive Communion, even small children (although if you’re in the Latin rite, children don’t receive Communion unless they’ve had their first Communion).

 

READER COMMENTS

Posted Friday, June 08, 2012 4:26 AM By charlio
They have a Holy Ikon which appears to show our Lord standing above our Lady who is lying on the ground sleeping or deceased. Our Lord is holding a female infant in His arms.


Posted Friday, June 08, 2012 10:13 AM By pete
That icon would be the Dormition (death) of the Theotokos, whose soul-body her Son is taking to heaven, the equivalent to our Assumption.


Posted Friday, June 08, 2012 2:42 PM By joe
The Sacred Species is given by intinction. Not “tincture” that is when you steep herbs in liquor. Please publish facts.


Posted Friday, June 08, 2012 4:43 PM By max
FINALLY a church that’s nott being attacked for not having the tridentine mass! this must be a miracle day! also, no one griping about the lack of kneeelrs! is the usual fan crowd away on vacation, or what???


Posted Friday, June 08, 2012 5:45 PM By whhaiber
I am very interested to see further “Churches Worth Driving To” of the Eastern Uniate Rites (Ukrainian, Ruthenian, Chaldean, etc.)!


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 2:20 AM By Angelo
The first time I attended a Byzantine Divine Liturgy I was impressed. It rivaled the TLM. It was a great consolation that from beggining to end, the Priest and Cantors pleaded to God to grant us mercy. Everything was performed in an orderly manner. During the Liturgy even giving alms for the poor was done with dignity. We folded our arms in the form of a Cross, said a silent prayer, gave our offering. In turn we were handed a small blessed loaf. I don’t know what it all symbolized, but as in the TLM I knew I had received all the graces whether I understood or not. Like the TLM the Byzantine Divine Liturgy is all God centered. joe, I believe receiving communion by “tincture” is correct. Intinction is when the Sacred Host is partialy dipped in the precious Blood. At the Byzantine Liturgy the priest with a spoon completely immerses the Host into the Precious Blood and with the spoon drops it into our mouths. The whole Host is immersed completely. I believe this article makes that point in the last paragraph.


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 8:01 AM By MacDonald
Never having attended liturgy in a Melkite-Greek Church, I wonder if anyone knows PRECISELY how they distribute the Eucharist? For example, do they use a “holy spoon” as the Orthodox do (so that everyone receives under both species at each liturgy), or do the Melkite-Greek priests use Hosts as we Latin Rite Catholics do, practicing intinction, that is, dipping the Host into the Precious Blood and then placing the Host on the communicant’s tongue?


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 1:07 PM By JLS
What MacD describes about the priest dipping the Latin rite Host into the Precious Blood and then placing it on the tongue would seem a fairly easy way to go about it. I’ve always been suspicious of the explanation that there is no need to provide the Precious Blood to the laity.


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 2:50 PM By Anne T.
Max, standing is the correct and traditional thing to do for the Eastern Rite, It is not for the Latin Rite. That is why no Latin Rite person would complain about not having kneelers in an Eastern Catholic church. We all have the right to our own rite. (Excuse the pun please, and I hope you had a good laught with that one. We need some humor on here at times.)


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 3:18 PM By Kenneth M. Fisher
Max, You know darn well, or at least you should, that the Eastern Churches were never required to change the way they celebrated the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, only the Roman Rite was asked, actually illegaly ordered, to do so. The Maronites, as far as I know, are the only ones who voluntarily changed some of their Rite. I am also a Maronite, and I know a Maronite priest who held out as long as he could from changing the way he faced for the Liturgy. God bless, yours in their Hearts, Kenneth M. Fisher


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 3:55 PM By Anne T.
Mac Donald, the above article says that the priest serves Holy Communion by dipping (intincting) the Host with a small spoon into the chalice of the Sacred Blood and putting the spoon into the open mouth of the Communicant. When I have received in such a manner, the priest put the spoon into my wide open mouth and turned it upside down without touching me in order to deposit the moist host on my tongue. It is almost like receiving it on the tongue but with a spoon. I hope someone on here tells us the name of the special spoon as I do not have time to look it up. The altar server holds a special sacred cloth underneath one’s mouth in order to catch the host if it falls. At least that was way it was done for me.


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 6:42 PM By Anne T.
Please forgive me for not capitalizing “Host” in my last post. I forgot to do so.


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 6:53 PM By MacDonald
Friends, I looked up the “HOLY SPOON” used by Orthodox Christians, and found this: “While there is no fear then of disease, it is pertinent that all Orthodox Christians follow certain basic rules of hygiene before approaching the holy chalice. First, it is important for us to wipe our mouths well after receiving Holy Communion. This prevents the elements from accidentally dripping onto the ground. Also, it is important for women who wear lipstick to wipe it off before receiving Communion or not to wear any lipstick at all when attending church. Not only does this show the proper respect to the Body and Blood of Christ, but it also shows respect to the woman’s fellow communicants who wish to commune the Holy Bread and Cup and nothing else! Finally, when receiving Communion, some individuals may wish to simply open their mouths wide and allow the priest to ‘drop’ the Communion into their mouths, thus not allowing the spoon to make contact with their mouths.”


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 6:58 PM By Anne T.
From what I can find on line the sacred utensils are just called a spear and a spoon. I am not sure why the spear is used. There are websites under “Etiquette in Eastern Catholic chuches if one wants to know more about their procedures.. JLS, most Latin Rite Catholic Churches do not serve the Host by intinction, I have been told, because they have far more Communicants at each Mass than there are in an Eastern Rite Divine Liturgy. Never-the-less, some Latin priests do serve the Host by intinction at smaller, more private Masses, such as for funerals or weddings.


Posted Saturday, June 09, 2012 7:26 PM By Anne T.
Also, in many, perhaps all, Eastern Rite liturgies, the priest announces the first name of the person receiving Communion if he or she wants the priest to do so. It adds a very personal touch.


Posted Sunday, June 10, 2012 7:39 AM By MacDonald
SPOON FOR COMMUNION: “In the Byzantine Rite, when it comes time for the Communion of the faithful, the Lamb (Host) is cut into smaller portions and placed in the Chalice, and thus distributed to the faithful using the Spoon. In this way, the faithful receive both the Body and the Blood of Christ, without taking the Mysteries into their hands. At the end of the Liturgy, the deacon will use the Spoon to consume the remaining Gifts (Body and Blood of Christ), and then ablute the Spoon, Spear and Chalice using wine and hot water (the Diskos is usually abluted only with hot water)…Since the Spoon is one of the Sacred Vessels it is usually kept on the Table of Oblation (Prothesis), where the bread and wine are prepared for the Eucharist. Often when a Chalice and Diskos (Paten) are made, an Asterisk, Spoon, and Spear will be made to match them. Because it touches the Body and Blood of Christ, the liturgical spoon should be made of gold, or at least be gold plated.”


Posted Sunday, June 10, 2012 7:41 AM By MacDonald
Years ago I read the rubrics for the Latin Rite Mass, which recommend that the faithful receive under both species, and suggest using a special silver “straw” to receive the Precious Blood from the chalice. Given the HUGE numbers of people we have in our churches each Sunday, however, it seems impossible for me to imagine having enough silver straws for each person…


Posted Sunday, June 10, 2012 6:19 PM By Kenneth M. Fisher
Those who believe as the Church has always believed, that the Body of Christ also contains His Blood, do not have to receive from the cup. There is a possibility of receiving from the Chalice will pass on germs, even deadly ones. The Host is the Body and Blood of Our Lord; however it still contains the accidentals of bread and wine and thus it can also contain germs. The desire and eventual demand for the Communion in both species is just another example of those who had the True Faith wanting to imitate the Separated Brethren who do not have the True Faith. I don’t believe this practice is Universal in the Church. God bless, yours in Their Hearts, Kenneth M. Fisher


Posted Sunday, June 10, 2012 6:20 PM By Kenneth M. Fisher
Those who believe as the Roman Church has always believed, that the Body of Christ also contains His Blood, do not have to receive from the cup. There is a possibility of receiving from the Chalice will pass on germs, even deadly ones. The Host is the Body and Blood of Our Lord; however it still contains the accidentals of bread and wine and thus it can also contain germs. The desire and eventual demand for the Communion in both species is just another example of those who had the True Faith wanting to imitate the Separated Brethren who do not have the True Faith. I don’t believe this practice is Universal in the Church. God bless, yours in Their Hearts, Kenneth M. Fisher


Posted Sunday, June 10, 2012 9:31 PM By Anne T.
MacDonald, I do not think the straw idea is a good one, whether silver or not, since some people might backwash, especially children. Yuck! Can you imagine a First Communicant blowing bubbles in the Sacred Cup. I am sorry but having small grandchildren that was the first thing that came to mind when you mentioned it.