Drugs that are being used to halt puberty in gender-confused youth have been linked to thousands of adult deaths, government data show.

The Food & Drug Administration has recorded thousands of deaths associated with Lupron, a puberty-blocking drug that is routinely used to treat prostate cancer in men and endometriosis in women. Adverse complications related to its use include breast disorders, malignant neoplasms, and psychiatric and nervous disorders. 

Lupron — and other drugs in its class — significantly alters the hormone levels in the body and has been documented to contribute to blood clots and other cardiovascular complications, as well as brittle bones and faulty joints.

Between 2004 and June 30 of this year, the FDA documented 33,478 adverse reactions suffered by patients who took Leuprolide Acetate (Lupron), which is used as a hormone blocker. More than 19,054 reactions were considered “serious,” including 6,056 deaths.

The figure rises when factoring in the total number of adverse reactions logged by the FDA since 1984. In total, there have been 40,764 adverse reactions, 25,513 of those were considered “serious,” among those were 6,370 deaths. 

Lupron is being prescribed off-label for use in children who have been diagnosed with gender dysphoria despite the lack of formal FDA approval for that purpose. The drug is clinically approved for treatment of precocious puberty, a condition where children start their pubertal processes at an abnormally early age and the blocker is administered for a short time until the proper age.

When injected into a physically healthy body, the drug interrupts a normally-functioning endocrine system, yielding hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, according to Michael Laidlaw, a Rocklin, California-based endocrinologist. 

“It’s a serious condition that endocrinologists would normally diagnose and treat because it interferes with development, but in [gender dysphoria] cases they’re inducing this disease state,” he said in an interview with the National Catholic Register.

According to the annual report of AbbVie, the company that produces Lupron, sales of the drug were approximately $669 million in 2017 in the United States alone.

Full story at The Christian Post.